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dimanche, juillet 5, 2020

méduses box et d’irukandji

  • Créateur
    Sujet
  • #57655
    benomar
    Participant

    Bonjour

    Je vais en Australie dans 3 jours et je me demande quels sont les risques de renconter des méduses box et d’irukandji en Aout dans la région de Cairns et les iles de la barrière. Peut on acheter un anti venin en pharmacie??



10 réponses de 1 à 10 (sur un total de 10)
  • Auteur
    Réponses
  • #261956
    Mahogany
    Membre
    Résident

    lol, elles sont toutes les deux mortelles, ca depend de la dose de venin injectee. A ma connaissance un anti venin pour l’irukandji est en etude donc pas encore dispo (http://www.hermonslade.org.au/projects/HSF_97_1/hsf_97_1.htm). Pour la box jellyfish et autres meduses de la meme famille un vaccin existe, Cf info: http://www.toxinology.com/generic_static_files/cslavh_antivenom_boxjelly.html

    De toute facon c’est simple soit tu verras un panneau interdit a la baignade pour cause de meduses soit tu verras personne dans l’eau 😆 et libre a toi de t’y aventurer.
    Cheers



    #261957
    Anonyme
    Inactif
    benomar wrote:
    Bonjour

    Je vais en Australie dans 3 jours et je me demande quels sont les risques de renconter des méduses box et d’irukandji en Aout dans la région de Cairns et les iles de la barrière. Peut on acheter un anti venin en pharmacie??

    J’ai voulu acheter la crème préventive MEDUSYL mais la pharmacienne m’a dit que le tube contenait plus de 100ml (maximum autorisé), j’espère la trouver sur place en Australie. Je ne l’ai pas encore testée (heureusement) mais voici quelques infos sur cette crème anti-méduses :

    http://www.medusyl.com/



    #261958
    Rainbow wrote:
    J’ai voulu acheter la crème préventive MEDUSYL mais la pharmacienne m’a dit que le tube contenait plus de 100ml (maximum autorisé), j’espère la trouver sur place en Australie. Je ne l’ai pas encore testée (heureusement) mais voici quelques infos sur cette crème anti-méduses :

    http://www.medusyl.com/

    lol, t’as peur d’être attaqué par les méduses dans l’avion?!
    les 100ml c’est dans le bagage à main que c’est interdit, pas dans les valises en soute!



    Deux Belges en Australie pour un an depuis fin septembre 2008 : smoz.travelblog.fr
    #261959
    Anonyme
    Inactif
    *alma* wrote:
    Rainbow wrote:
    J’ai voulu acheter la crème préventive MEDUSYL mais la pharmacienne m’a dit que le tube contenait plus de 100ml (maximum autorisé), j’espère la trouver sur place en Australie. Je ne l’ai pas encore testée (heureusement) mais voici quelques infos sur cette crème anti-méduses :

    http://www.medusyl.com/

    lol, t’as peur d’être attaqué par les méduses dans l’avion?!
    les 100ml c’est dans le bagage à main que c’est interdit, pas dans les valises en soute!

    Justement… je n’emporte qu’un sac à dos en cabine… 😉 je n’aurai pas de bagage en soute 🙂



    #261960
    Buell
    Participant

    Bravo le doublon pour le message… 🙄

    Bon sinon effectivement, tu sera informé sur place des risques, et tu peux louer une wetsuit pour te baigner.



    There is no way to happiness Happiness is the way :D ... [/
    #261961
    benomar
    Participant

    wé wé c pa tré drole de se baigner en combin’ lol
    mé bon jvé voir sur place; jpense qu’en Aout ya pa tro de méduses.



    #261962
    Buell
    Participant
    benomar wrote:
    Bonjour

    Je vais en Australie dans 3 jours et je me demande quels sont les risques de renconter des méduses box et d’irukandji en Aout dans la région de Cairns et les iles de la barrière. Peut on acheter un anti venin en pharmacie??

    benomar wrote:
    wé wé c pa tré drole de se baigner en combin’ lol
    mé bon jvé voir sur place; jpense qu’en Aout ya pa tro de méduses.

    Aïe Aïe Aïe…. pas-content-54.gif tu n’as pas l’impression que ton style a DRAMATIQUEMENT changé entre tes deux messages?
    On a un peu tendance à se répéter, mais le style sms est proscrit sur ce forum, c’est inscrit dans la charte… prisonnier3.gif alors fais attention pour les prochains posts, cela te permettra d’avoir un maximum de réponses 😉
    Cheers!
    Buell

    Sinon, pour info sur tes méduses et leurs moeurs:
    http://www.outback-australia-travel-secrets.com/box-jellyfish.html



    There is no way to happiness Happiness is the way :D ... [/
    #261963
    Buell
    Participant

    Lien cité ci dessus en quote:

    Quote:
    Box Jellyfish Facts

    *

    Box jellyfish belong to the class Cubozoa, and are not a true jellyfish (Scyphozoa), although they show many similar characteristics.
    *

    The bell or cube shaped jellyfish has four distinct sides, hence the box in the name.
    *

    When people talk about the extremely dangerous Australian box jellyfish they refer to the species Chironex fleckeri. This is the largest box jellyfish species.
    *

    The other species that is known to have caused deaths is Carukia barnesi, commonly called Irukandji. This one is a tiny jellyfish, only about thumbnail size. I talk about Irukandji here.
    *

    There are other species and not all are poisonous. (From here on, if I say box jellyfish, I am referring to Chironex fleckeri.)
    *

    A fully grown box jellyfish has a respectable size: it measures up to 20cm along each box side (or 30 cm in diameter), and the tentacles can grow up to 3 metres in length. Its weight can reach 2 kg.
    *

    There are about 15 tentacles on each corner, and each tentacle has many thousand stinging cells (nematocysts). The stinging cells are activated by contact with certain chemicals on the surface of fish, shellfish or humans.
    *

    Box jellyfish are transparent and pale blue in colour, which makes them pretty much invisible in the water. So much so that for years nobody knew what was causing swimmers such excruciating pain, and sometimes killed them.
    *

    The box jellyfish propels itself forward in a jet like motion and can reach three to four knots, that’s 1.5 to 2 metres per second. (True jellyfish in contrast rather drift.)
    *

    Box jellyfish can see. They have clusters of eyes on each side of the box. Some of those eyes are surprisingly sophisticated, with a lens and cornea, an iris that can contract in bright light, and a retina.
    *

    Their speed and vision leads some researchers to believe that box jellyfish actively hunt their prey, others insist they are passive opportunists, meaning they just hang around and wait for prey to bump into their tentacles. They certainly are very good at avoiding even tiny objects and probably at least try to avoid humans, too.
    *

    Box jellyfish venom is very different from the venom of the true jellyfish. More on the venom and its effects below.
    *

    Chironex fleckeri have caused at least 63 deaths in Australia since 1884. (Irukandji caused two that we know of.)

    Return to top
    Box Jellyfish Habitat, Life Cycle And Food

    The Australian box jellyfish is found in the tropical oceans around northern Australia. Their habitat extends as far south as Exmouth on the west coast, and Bustard Heads on the east coast (just north of Agnes Waters). Chironex fleckeri is also present in the waters of the Indo-Pacific region near Papua New Guinea, the Phillipines and Vietnam. Their exact distribution hasn’t been determined yet.

    Box Jellyfish like to hang around river mouths, estuaries and creeks, especially after rain. When the tide is rising they tend to move towards shallower waters. What they don’t like are deep waters and rough seas. They are also absent over coral reefs, and over areas that have lots of seagrass or weed.

    In late summer the adult jellyfish spawn at the river mouths. The eggs, once fertilised, turn into tiny polyps that attach themselves to rocks where they develop until next spring. Spring sees the polyps turn into tiny jellyfish that are washed downstream with the summer rains.

    Box Jellyfish eat small fish and crustaceans. If you picture a tiny jellyfish struggling with a shrimp you may imagine how easy it would be for the shrimp to tear the jellyfish. That’s why the jellyfish developed that very potent venom, they need to kill the shrimp instantly…

    Return to top
    The Box Jellyfish Season

    It’s hard to give a general answer as to when exactly the stinger season starts and ends, the general rule says wet season is stinger season, and that’s from October/November to April/May.

    Closer to the equator they are found earlier in the year than in the tropics. Smaller stingers appear every year in Darwin in August! They are only half the size of the large ones found in Queensland, and nobody knows why.

    The largest specimen are usually found towards the end of the season, but for no particular reason in some years there may be large specimen in some locations early in the season.

    You also can’t count on the season ending in April/May. Especially in the southern parts you may encounter stingers well into June.

    Box Jellyfish stings have been reported in all months in the Northern Territory, and in all months but June and July in Queensland!

    Return to top
    The Box Jellyfish Sting And Venom

    Stings of Chironex fleckeri have several very severe consequences, due to its cardiotoxic (effect on the heart), neurotoxic (damage to the nerves) and dermatonecrotic (effect on the skin) components.

    What does that mean? To start with it is not uncommon for victims who have had extensive contact (three metres of tentacles touching the skin can be enough to be fatal) to experience cardiac arrest within minutes.

    Even if that is not the case the pain from a sting is so excruciating and overwhelming that a victim can immediately go into shock, fatal if the victim is swimming alone. Someone stung while swimming will rarely be able to make it back to shore on their own.

    The tentacles stick tightly to the skin and may continue to release venom if not treated correctly, making things worse. Severe stings can lead to necrosis of the affected tissue (which means it gets eaten away…), which is where the nasty scars come from.

    The severity of a sting depends on the size of the box jellyfish, the amount of tentacles involved, the size of the victim (children are obviously more vulnerable), but also on the sensitivity of the skin of the victim.

    Return to top
    First Aid For Box Jellyfish Stings

    The Chironex fleckeri venom is so potent that in severe cases victims can quickly go into cardiac arrest! If that’s the case obviously CPR (cardio pulmonary resuscitation) takes priority over everything else.

    Luckily it’s not always that bad. It depends where the tentacles touched (across the chest is obviously a lot more dangerous than on the ankle), and how much venom was released.

    Usually the most important thing to do first is to inactivate the remaining stinging cells. This should be done by pouring normal vinegar over the tentacles (soak for at least 30 seconds). Only then can the tentacles be removed, otherwise you will cause more venom to be released.

    Many popular Australian beaches where box jellyfish are present will even have a bottle of vinegar stored on the beach next to the warning signs. Ordinary vinegar has saved dozens of lives of unfortunate swimmers and there is no other first aid remedy that is recommended, despite what you may read elsewhere (methylated spirits, ammonia, urine, bicarbonate soda and what not…). A bottle of vinegar is certainly a useful addition to your first aid kit.

    In mild cases the effects of the venom can be managed with ice, painkillers and antihistamins. More serious cases will likely require treatment of the systemic symptoms, and that means antivenin. All ambulances, hospitals and medical centres in box jellyfish areas will carry the antivenin, as in serious cases it needs to be given within minutes! Early administration of the antivenom can relieve the pain and may also reduce scarring.

    The need for antivenom is indicated by cardio-respiratory arrest (obviously, but then it’s often too late to reverse the effects of the venom), irregular heartbeat, difficulty breathing or swallowing and by extensive skin damage (which indicates the release of a great amount of venom).

    If there is no help nearby then a pressure immobilisation bandage as described for snake bites should be applied and the patient transported to the next medical centre as quickly as possible.

    Note: there is no antivenom for Irukandji!

    Autre site qui traite du sujet, articles scientifiques en général:
    http://www.jellyfishinfo.net/box-jellyfish/



    There is no way to happiness Happiness is the way :D ... [/
    #261964
    Buell
    Participant

    Et un petit dernier vu que tu ne veux pas te baigner en wetsuit 😉
    https://www.underwatertimes.com/news.php?article_id=18954603710

    Quote:
    Queensland, Australia () Two shocking deaths in as many days in waters off Queensland were tragic but avoidable, according to experts.

    Sarah Whiley, 21, died after being savaged by up to three bull sharks off North Stradbroke Island last Saturday.

    The shark fatality was the first at a protected beach since Queensland introduced its Shark Safety Program 44 years ago and the first in Australia since an attack off South Australia last August.

    Barely 24 hours later a seven-year-old girl died from a suspected box jellyfish sting near Bamaga in Cape York Peninsula.

    It was the 70th fatality from box jellyfish stings in Australia since 1884, the last being in 2003.

    Does it mean people should steer clear of the water with a range of potentially fatal creatures like crocodiles, blue-ringed octopus, box jellyfish and large number of different species of sharks – including great whites, whalers, tigers and bull sharks?.

    Not so, say experts.

    Instead, the public should respect – rather than fear – the water and observe certain rules while in it.

    According to Sunshine Coast’s Underwater World curator Andreas Fischer all the warning signs were there for a bull shark attack – murky water near a river mouth late in the afternoon with schools of baitfish nearby.

    « If you add up all those factors you have the possibility of something happening and that was the case at North Stradbroke Island, » Mr Fischer said.

    « At the end of the day it is just a matter of public education, knowing what’s out there and what to avoid. »

    So just how dangerous are Australian waters?

    Mr Fischer agreed there are potential risks in Australian waters.

    « But it’s difficult to say it’s a high risk area because the chances of it happening are very minimal, » he said.

    « There are a number of aggressive species here but if you are going to compare it to other countries it is not that much different.

    « To be honest, I think the recent fatalities were just unlucky incidents. »

    Police this week re-opened a 2km stretch of beaches east and west of the shark attack site, but government wildlife officers are still scouring the waters for the sharks responsible.

    Surf lifesavers have implored swimmers to stay away from Amity Beach, the site of the attack on North Stradbroke Island.

    But Mr Fisher called for a common sense approach to the fatality, not a knee jerk reaction.

    « It was the first shark attack in that area for 44 years … while it is very tragic, how many people die in car crashes each year?, » Mr Fischer said.

    « When a fatality like this happens it is not handled very well.

    « They want to go out and kill everything that moves in the water.

    « But if you put it in perspective … we are going into a marine environment which is not our natural domain and there is an increased risk of something happening.

    « But even that increased risk is very minimal compared to something else like road fatalities. »

    The girl’s death from a suspected box jellyfish sting has also delivered a timely wake-up call.

    « Box jellyfish is the world’s most venomous animal, it can kill in three minutes, » said Dr Lisa-Ann Gershwin, Surf Lifesaving Australia’s national marine stinger adviser.

    « It’s an absolute tragedy because it’s 100 per cent preventable.

    « If she had been wearing … any type of barrier between the skin and tentacles this would not have happened. »

    Dr Gershwin said box jellyfish were passive creatures and they don’t hunt nor are they aggressive.

    « If they see you coming they’ll try to get away, » she said.

    « It’s not the box jellyfish hunting people, it’s the people surprising the animal. »

    Box jellyfish are prevalent in summer months from Gladstone, central Queensland north around Australia to Exmouth in Western Australia.

    While Australia has recorded 70 deaths since 1884, the records in other countries are far worse.

    « If you look at the Philippines, they get about 90 fatalities a year from box jellyfish, » said Dr Gershwin.

    « You look at that and you think `wow, we’re doing pretty good here’ – but I don’t want people here to get complacent. »

    Je ne sais plus si c’est dans cet article (pas le temps de relire, Buell in a hurry!) mais ils disaient que même si les gens n’avaient pas les moyens d’acheter une wetsuit pour cet enfant, ils auraient pu lui faire porter un jean qui aurait fait barrière entre les tentacules et la peau, évitant la mort de l’enfant. Bref, no comment comme ils mettent sur les chaînes d’info…

    Toujours préoccupé par ton bronzage ou tu penses que pour tes sessions baignades tu vas quand même penser à la wetsuit?
    Tu auras tout le loisir de bronzer sans marque sur le sable, loin des tentacules de ces vilaines bêtes… de toutes façons, sur place, s’il y a un risque, tu verras les gens avec leur wetsuit..



    There is no way to happiness Happiness is the way :D ... [/
    #261965
    Buell
    Participant

    Ah alors pour la mode plage de ta baignade je t’ai trouvé ça:

    Quote:
    Titre= « GIGN »
    stinger suit cagoule et gants pour aller se baigner a cause des jellyfish… les lunettes c est juste pour le fun, y en a pas besoin dans l eau…

    qui va avec la photo…. :

    463885537_small.jpg

    😆

    Tu n’es plus là d’ailleurs? Tu es fâché avec ton sujet?



    There is no way to happiness Happiness is the way :D ... [/
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